On campaign drinks and the thirst for power in the @DeliNYC mayoral campaign #MayorThurston


I checked in to Delicatessen this evening and was greeted with the following tip from my opponent:

Drink recommendation - not on menu - "The Toast Of The Town" designed by Barry: 1/2 ounce lime juice, Strawberry, 1/4 ounce Campari, Prosecco, lemon twist - in a champagne flute. #magnolfi4mayor

She doesn't stop.

I now have three whisky-based drinks.

by Barry, we have the Whiskey Thurston
  • Makers
  • Lemon juice
  • Honey
  • Flaming orange peel

by Coco, we have the Whisky Juniper

  • Makers 
  • Hendricks
  • muddled lime & cucumber
  • St. Germain 
  • splash of soda

yes, it has whisky AND gin. I didn't think that was a great idea either, but it works.

by Tom, we have the Whisky Sangria

  • Makers
  • pear purée
  • OJ splash
  • muddled oranges & strawberries & mint
  • lime juice
  • simple syrup
  • touch of redbull. just a touch.

I must give credit where it is due, however. Magnolfi was the first to use off-menu drinks as a campaign strategy, and she deserves credit for the innovation. I do take issue with her latest choice, though.

"Toast of the Town?" Really? Is my opponent so power-thirsty that she declares influence not merely over Delicatessen but over the entire town? Could it be that she's using her pursuit of the Delicatessen mayorship merely as a stepping stone to higher, town-wide office? These are questions the people should be asking of the Magnolfi campaign. 

Further, this is the second Prosecco-based drink to be issued from the Magnolfi campaign, and I think the people deserve some clarification of this choice. Magnolfi would have you believe that like Prosecco, her mayorship would be sweet and bubbly, but take a closer look at the ingredients in the Toast of the Town as well her her Magnolfi Spritzer. Both include Campari. What do we know about this Campari? Well according to Wikipedia:

Campari is an alcoholic apéritif (20.5%, 21%, 25% or 28% alcohol depending on the country in which it is purchased) obtained from the infusion of bitter herbs, aromatic plants, and fruit (including chinotto) in alcohol and water

Yes, the people require refreshment. Yes, the people are thirsty. But should this thirst be quenched by bitterness masked by aromatic plants and fruit? Is that really the basis for solid leadership that Delicatessen needs?

I look forward to addressing these issues and more in our debate later in the week. Details will be forthcoming. Stay tuned.